PRESENTATIONS

Events

Looking for a brief introduction to a more productive way to learn from and improve work?

Our fun and insightful presentations provide introductions on how to tap into the creative problem solving of people to innovate and improve operations. For our scheduled presentations at international, national, regional, or local conferences and meetings, see below. Come learn with us!

Upcoming Presentations

2020 Bay Area Safety Symposium

March 4

San Ramon, CA

6 Lies About Work Safety Pros Believe

Work is an integral part of what safety professionals do. Every control measure, every training, every policy, every intervention is designed to change and influence how people do work. It is surprising then how little time safety professionals dedicated to understanding work. We spend so much time talking about new regulations, new hazards, new risks, new policies, new technologies, new behavioral interventions, but hardly any time trying to understand the most basic human experience of how people interact with their jobs. Given that everything we do springs from, affects, and is affected by work, this is a bit surprising.

Of course, the lack of focus on work makes sense when you remember that we all do work. We experience it every day, so how could we misunderstand something we are so familiar with? But this is precisely what has happened in the safety profession. Familiarity has bred a lack of curiosity, which has led to the acceptance of many false beliefs about what it takes to get work done in organizations. This presentation will identify six lies that many safety pros believe about work without questioning. These include lies such as “we manage safety,” “work is easy,” and “habits are good and complacency is bad.” We will discuss why these and other beliefs are false and how we can correct our understanding of work to improve safety and operational performance.

San Diego ASSP Professional Development Conference 2020

March 10

San Diego, CA

6 Lies About Work Safety Pros Believe

Work is an integral part of what safety professionals do. Every control measure, every training, every policy, every intervention is designed to change and influence how people do work. It is surprising then how little time safety professionals dedicated to understanding work. We spend so much time talking about new regulations, new hazards, new risks, new policies, new technologies, new behavioral interventions, but hardly any time trying to understand the most basic human experience of how people interact with their jobs. Given that everything we do springs from, affects, and is affected by work, this is a bit surprising.

Of course, the lack of focus on work makes sense when you remember that we all do work. We experience it every day, so how could we misunderstand something we are so familiar with? But this is precisely what has happened in the safety profession. Familiarity has bred a lack of curiosity, which has led to the acceptance of many false beliefs about what it takes to get work done in organizations. This presentation will identify six lies that many safety pros believe about work without questioning. These include lies such as “we manage safety,” “work is easy,” and “habits are good and complacency is bad.” We will discuss why these and other beliefs are false and how we can correct our understanding of work to improve safety and operational performance.

ASSP Safety 2020 Professional Development Conference

June 23

Orlando, FL

Resilient Safety Management Systems

Everyone agrees that safety management systems are an important part of improving safety performance within an organization. The approach is intuitive and seems to just make sense. However, the research on the effectiveness of safety management systems is mixed, with some research showing little or no benefit. Why is that? One reason could be that the assumptions that safety management systems are built on can vary from organization to organization. If an organization with bad assumptions about what it takes to create safety in their organization implements a safety management system then it makes sense that those bad assumptions would infect how the system is implemented and create bad outcomes.

Resilience engineering, an approach to safety management (and other forms of management) introduced by researchers in the early turn of the century, may hold the key to create safety management systems that yield more productive, reliable outcomes. Resilience engineering is based upon decades of empirical research in high risk domains and focuses organizations not on just what goes wrong but on how to create the conditions for things to go right. Specifically, resilience engineering challenges organizations to develop four cornerstones to enable resilient operations – the ability to respond to the risks and opportunities that are known, the ability to monitor events for changes, the ability to anticipate future changes, and the ability to learn from what’s happening to improve the capacity for future resilience.

This presentation will discuss how resilience engineering can be integrated into a safety management system, such as ANSI Z10 or ISO 45001. The focus will be on how using the principles and practices of resilience engineering an SMS can be implemented that not only reduces risk but also creates the conditions for greater employee engagement, operational excellence, and organizational learning.

HASANZ Conference 2020

September 9-11

Wellington, New Zealand

Safety Through Learning – Safety-II in Practice

Organizations increasingly realize that to break through to the next level of safety performance a shift in perspective and practices is needed. In the words of Abraham Lincoln, ‘we must think anew and act anew.’ Safety-II and Human and Organizational Performance (HOP) have provided the foundation for a new way of thinking about safety. Many realize that they need to move away from a focus on blame, people as the problem, and learning only from failure toward a learning from everyday work and seeing people as the solution. Still many organizations wonder, so what? What they are supposed to do next?

The key is learning, or, more specifically, creating a capacity to learn within our organization. This presentation will review ways we can disrupt the ways that safety is practiced in the organization by making learning about what’s going on a core function. A framework for assessing our organization’s ability to learn and create innovation from that learning will be presented. Most importantly, there are things we can start doing almost immediately to start learning from and improving everyday work in our areas of responsibility.

Looking for a customized presentation for your organization?

Contact us for a customized solution!

Contact Us

Please send us an email and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

Not readable? Change text. captcha txt

Start typing and press Enter to search